Cadenhead’s 1842 Cask Rum

October in the UK. The weather is shit and it’s getting dark early, time for something a little more…….robust.

What is it? Who knows! Basically, Cask 1842 Rum is a rum from Independent bottlers Cadenhead, who do a whole range of whiskies, rums and other goodies. They own Springbank whisky in Campbeltown and are very active in sourcing and bottling their own range of spirits in various guises, from single casks to various small batches. As part of their range of spirits they offer “Cask 1842”, now this is not just a rum, they do the range for whiskies also, so don’t get confused. They have a “live” cask in the shop in Campbeltown for each of their offerings, in the case of this review it’s for their rum. A “live” cask is basically a quarter cask that is filled with a mixture of rums and left, once it gets about half empty they top it up with more rum, from whatever they have that they think with go well in the mix. They mix it around, leave it for a bit and then start to bottle again, once it gets half empty they top it up with some more rum. The result of this is that there’s some rum sloshing around in the cask from way back when, and quarter casks are smaller than your standard barrel so there is quicker wood interaction.

Naturally, there is no age statement on the bottle as it changes all the time depending what has been put in and given the nature of what’s being done with it, age statements are largely irrelevant. I’ve been told that all the rums in the cask are all “dark” rums from Guyana, Trinidad and Jamaica and that over the years some very old and rare rum has gone into the cask; 30 year old stuff and some Caroni for example, back when old Demerara rums were easy and cheap to come by!

This is a review of an 1842 Cask Rum that was bottled on 5/11/2018.

Natural colour, not chill filtered and bottled at 56.6% abv.

Sugar? Nope.

Nose: Smells like a big, rich Demerara at first; dark roasted coffee beans (something like the heavy roast Monsooned Malabar that I’m currently drinking), soft eating liquorice, boot polish, black olives and thick molasses or treacle. Vanilla, coconut and bourbon cask caramels pop up along with a nice little lift of lime juice and fresh pineapple. There is a little banana here and there, tar and a salty note that I can’t quite put my finger on.

Palate: Full, oily mouth feel, chewy. Yeah, heavy on the Demerara that’s for sure, very “British Navy” style I guess you could say. Chewing new leather, some rolling tobacco, treacle toffee, big black raisins, deep brown muscavado sugar, liquorice and blackberries. There’s a touch of fig, black cherry, dark chocolate (like an unsweet Black Forest cake, if it was possible), some banana and salty black olives again. The lime lift shows up here too just to freshen the palate and stop it getting bogged down.

Finish: Long. Liquorice again, bitters a little with walnuts, black coffee (more of a Sumatran this time), very dark chocolate, smoky sweet cigars and a bit of a savoury note I can’t pinpoint – it’s almost like a ham I had once that was covered in treacle, porter ale and smoked – it’s bitter, sweet and meaty all at the same time, really hard to explain.

Thoughts? I love this. It doesn’t have much balance, why would it, it’s bits of casks that have been chucked into another cask over years and years, but it’s got big and bold flavours, and a huge richness. I really like the idea of a live cask, and you can see how it changes over the years with each release, plus I know some very good rums have gone into this; it’s not a load of leftovers. A great winter rum by all accounts.

So I paid £48 for this, that’s a lot of money for a NAS rum, but given I know Cadenhead and the provenance of some of the rums that have gone into this over the years I’m happy to pay it. The only thing to watch, as always with Cadenhead, is their bloody delivery charges! If you’re going to order something from them then it’s worth batching up several bottles to justify the charges. I’ll be getting the next batch when it’s bottled, that’s for sure.

 

Dark Overproof – Kill Devil

What is it? This is a blended rum put together by Hunter Laing for their Kill Devil range of rums. The blend, at least as far this particular bottling is concerned, is comprised of aged rums from Guyana and Jamaica; there are no details of specifically which distilleries these base rums come from or any details on ageing – I have spoken to Hunter Laing about it but naturally (for commercial reasons) they cannot divulge their blend recipe, which is fair enough. I must note at this point, that the rum is actually quite dark, I know that it’s not very old and Hunter Laing have not added any colouring – this is because some of the rum (I’ll take a guess at the Guyanese aspect) has been coloured at source when it was put into cask. DDL are quite known for doing this so it’s no surprise, please be re-assured that HL have not coloured it.

No details provided on chill-filtration, it has been coloured by DDL at source and it’s bottled at 57% abv.

Sugar? None will have been added by Hunter Laing, but I can’t confirm lack of sugar as it’s possible that DDL have had a little play with the source rum – they sometimes coat the inside of casks with molasses prior to filling and this would add sugar into the rum when it ages…..I really need to get one of those hydrometer thingies.

Nose: Very hot on the nose, don’t get too far into the glass with this! Immediately very funky; blackened bananas, pineapple cube sweets, tinned apricots and some lime zest. Probably young Hampden making up a large part of the Jamaican aspect of the blend I’d guess. Next to this funk sits in some deeper, murkier, dirtier notes from the Demerara rum with shoe polish, coffee beans, black eating liquorice and charcoal, maybe some smoky tobacco in there too. There is a little lift of mint the more I nose this which freshens it up.

Palate: Hot, as you’d expect. Good weighted mouthfeel and coats well. Feels a little sweet at first. Ah yes, here we go, almost certain we’re talking young Hampden in here, it blends better on the palate then the nose with a toffee’d banana, chocolate covered coffee bean and pineapple fudge. There is a salty lime note through it which cuts any sweetness, a touch of engine oil (well, what the smell tastes like, if you get me), a little pine sap and a beef brisket that is smoking on a BBQ 2 doors down.

Finish: Medium, just about. Pretty much a combination of the nose and the palate, little newness added here; black coffee, some dark chocolate maybe, tobacco smoke, a little liquorice, leather maybe and plenty of over ripe bananas at the end.

Thoughts? Quite intense, young, fruity and weighty – a good Navy overproof blend. It’s fruitier and lighter than many “Navy” blends out there but it does have those dirtier notes too. If I’m being honest I’m a bit disappointed in the finish, it’s not very long nor does it add anything more to what’s already going on. I imagine this would be very good in a cocktail or with cola, and frankly it’s also pretty good sipped.

I’m sure we’ve got Hampden and heavy variant of Enmore in here as the 2 main rums, at a young age, maybe some Port Mourant too for good measure. Given that, the abv and the price of around £35, I think it’s a good buy and value for money. If I was after a really good overproof navy blend this is exactly what I’d pick up again.