Rum Nation Demerara 23 year old (1990)

What is it? A right treat, for a start! This rum is from the Port Mourant still, owned by Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) and is molasses based, making it Pure Single Rum. The rum was distilled in 1990 and aged for 14 years (no details of where, but looks to be in Europe), at which point it was bought and transferred into Olorso sherry casks for further ageing – this was done until bottling, in this case 2013 by Rum Nation, but there are some other bottles out there from the same parcel of rum that was aged for 25 years and bottled in 2015.

Not coloured, but chill filtered and bottled at 45% abv.

Sugar: No

Nose: Incredible, exactly what you’d hope for with a well aged Demerara; deep brown sugar (muscavado), really smooth black coffee like a Colombian or Guatemalan, damp leaves, pipe tobacco, really old leather chairs, muddy boots and some roasted chestnuts. Really beautiful soft oak, liquorice, clove, rich vanilla and raisins. There is a savoury side of aniseed balls, black olives and diesel in there too. The smells are all very “big” and rich.

Palate: Full mouth, oily. Old sherry aged whisky for sure, lots of rancio, forest floors and meaty mushrooms. The deep brown sugar arrives with coffee beans, chocolate, marzipan, plums, figs, raisins again and handful of black grapes. Lots of sweet eating liquorice, aniseed, clove, leather and sweet tobacco. A touch of rubber bands, sticking plasters and the back of a stamp keep things interesting.

Finish: Long. Liquorice in bucket loads here, some anise, vanilla and milk chocolate. There is a buzz of black pepper and menthol that pops up, just to keep you on your toes. Roasted nuts again, marzipan topped Christmas cake and a good glug of dry sherry.

Thoughts? Fabulous stuff. This is just what old Navy style Demerara should taste like; big, rich, bold and brooding flavours right through, and slightly dirty too. From nose to finish it is massively complex and deep, sure it’s not perfectly balanced but the pay off is volume and depth of flavour – i’ll take that without issue here.

I paid £100 for this, and honestly would again without much thought. My only issue is that it’s a bit too easy on approach, I’d love to see this at 50% abv, it’d be another level of rum altogether.

Bank’s Connoisseur’s Cut Guyana – Malt Whisky Cask

What is it? Guyanese rum from the Port Mourant Estate, distilled from molasses in the double wooden pot still – so Pure Single Rum. The cask marque is MPMM, which I don’t have too much information on, other than there are many Indie bottlings of Port Mourant marked “MPM” and I believe this means “Main Port Mourant”. This rum was distilled in 1997 where it was matured in ex-bourbon casks for 2 years before being moved over to ex-Malt Whisky casks in 2000. The bottling was done in July 2013 – which makes this rum 15 or 16 years old (depending on the exact distillation and bottling dates). It was part of an outrun of 205 bottles released and going off the taste profile and colour, aged in Europe somewhere (purely speculation on my part).

Natural colour, no chill filtering and bottled at cask strength of 59.58% abv.

Sugar? No.

For the record, I’ve taken this down to about 55% abv as that is the strength I’ve been drinking it at consistently. Nearly 60% abv makes it too narrow and tight, so the flavours just aren’t giving themselves up enough.

Nose: Aniseed, fennel seeds, black olives in brine, capers, shells and rock pools. A handful of dried anchovies and some distant tar. Very savoury and herbal that’s for sure! There is some dried banana and pineapple but drizzled in some type of liquorice sauce, a little sharp gooseberry and mango that has gone off and is fizzy sour. At the back there is a little warm oak, but faint and distant, runny honey and a malty flat beer like note. A scattering of almonds finish it off.

Palate: Full, intense mouth, oily. We’re right back with the nose here; anchovies, capers, seawater. salty olive, olive oil and fresh liquorice root. There is that tarry, oily, WD40 note in here, some faint sweet tobacco smoke and a burst of citrus fruit, but savoury like a smoked and salted box of lemons and limes. Slightly sour too with those gooseberries. There is some cask sweetness here towards the end with thin caramel, honey and a touch of cinnamon.

Finish: Long indeed. Again tar, liquorice and brine. It’s sweeter here though, allowing those honeys, caramels and roasted malty/sweet beer notes to show – I’m definitely picking up some Speyside whisky flavours in the finish. Some nice fresh banana notes pop up, slices of pineapple and green apple too.

Thoughts? Excellent. It’s got some powerful fresh and raw Port Mourant notes to it but you can tell it’s a lot more complex, it’s see time in oak even though the cask isn’t very evident, it tames the spirit. It’s a very intense rum and for £100 it was very pricey at the time I bought this, however, looking at what Independent full proof aged Port Mourants go for now, it seems about right….

I can’t decide if i like this better than the Cognac cask. It’s sweeter. My first thoughts were “it’s better” but with time I’m not sure. The oak/cask on the Cognac cask seemed to have more effect on the rum, which I think is what it needs.

Would I buy this again? Probably. Is it a rum for everyone? No. It’s very focused in what is presents and isn’t for your casual drinker.

Mezan Jamaica 2005 (Worthy Park)

What is it? Jamaican Pure Single Rum, so molasses based, distilled at the Worthy Park distillery, in Jamaica, on a pot still in 2005 and bottled by Independent bottler Mezan in around 2015/2016, making this approx 10 years old. You may see another of these 2005 Jamaica’s around at the moment, that is a more recent bottling (2017) and bottled at a higher abv of 46% abv. From what I understand this rum was entirely matured in Europe. There are no details on the bottle outrun or the marque that has gone into this bottling, and I’ve not been able to find that information out anywhere either.

Not coloured or chill filtered and bottled at 40% abv. It’s ok, Mezan have done away with this low abv now on their more recent bottlings, worry not!

Sugar? No.

Nose: Hmmm, quite a light Worth Park here. Certainly bananas, lemon and lime (Sprite or 7up), very light golden syrup, more so than honey. Some cake’y, bread’y notes, so maybe indeed banana bread or banana pie. A little vanilla maybe, a tiny prickle of oak (I mean tiny) and a little bit of salty brine. Some really lovely generic floral notes are here too but I can’t pick out anything specific.

Palate: Medium mouth. Soft entry, quite acidic at first with green apples, gooseberries, sharp cider, grass and under ripe nectarine. There is a nice, creamier buttery/custard side that appears mid-palate with a touch of honey and chamomile tea, but doesn’t last long and goes salty, tarry and sour again to the finish.

Finish: Medium in length. Sweeter white wine (like a sweet Riesling), some green olives, a little tar, orange blossom honey and even a little milk chocolate pops up! Very little heat, spice or oak at all from the cask.

Thoughts? Quite different to Worthy Parks I’ve had before, I can see the similarities – a good whack of banana in there for sure – but it’s very soft, light and raw. A nice bottle to see how different styles from a distillery present themselves, but for me it was just lacking any real wow or oomph. I can’t even say it was the abv this time, I just think that it was too spirit driven (which is fine normally) but in this case the wrong marque of rum. Maybe this would have normally been blend filler?

Clearly very well made rum and at £33 (at the time of purchase in 2016) was a no brainer, but it’s not a rum I’d go back to. Just not enough on offer for me.

Mezan Guyana 2005 (Port Mourant)

What is it? This rum is a molasses based rum from the Diamond distillery in Guyana, specifically from the Port Mourant double wooden pot still – making this a Pure Single Rum . It was distilled in 2005 and I believe it was bottled in 2015/2016 making the rum 10 years of age. Recently Mezan have changed their labelling to show more information on ageing and bottling, but this is an old bottle so there isn’t much to go off. From what I understand, and certainly get from the tasting, is that this is European aged rum.

Not coloured, not chill filtered and bottled at 40% abv.

Nose: Quite pungent, you can smell it from quite a way off, so I’ve high hopes for this. Really fruity at the start with bananas, guava, papaya, a lovely light blossom honey and a whole host of fresh flowers – summer in a glass! The deeper in you get it starts to show it’s savoury side with aniseed, red peppers, fennel seeds, light liquorice, liquorice root, fresh ginger and menthol.

Palate: Medium mouth. Not so much fruit here, lots of fennel tea, aniseed balls, ginger again, brine, shellfish and some tarragon. It’s very herbal and really quite spicy. There is a dried banana note in there and a touch of sharp mango, but not much.

Finish: Medium. Spicy from the ginger and white pepper, but there is a softer more buttery side as it progresses, a little horseradish sauce. Fruitier at the end with lots more bananas and that guava. A slight tannic note is the only evidence of any age.

Thoughts? Lovely nose but the palate and finish let it down. There are some good flavours and a bit of complexity but it feels too young. It’s very spirit driven, which is fine, but it needs to be approaching 50% abv if they’re relying on it’s spirit character alone. I’d say it needed fresher casks really to add more depth into the rum.

This cost me £35 back in 2017, which is a good solid buy and something a little different; naturally presented “raw” rum. I’m not sure I’d be buying this again though, even if there were any left about.

Worthy Park Single Estate Reserve

What is it? Jamaican Pure Single Rum, so 100% pot still rum, from Molasses, and produced at the Worthy Park distillery in Jamaica. The rums that go into this blend are aged tropically for between 6 and 10 years before being blended for the final rum, and all of that ageing takes place in first fill ex-bourbon casks (only previously held bourbon, nothing else).

No dunder is used at Worthy Park, the esters are produced during fermentation using a propriety yeast strain and control of time for the fermentation. The marque used for this rum is entirely from the WPL marque, which is a lighter Worthy Park and comes in at 60-119g/laa. For reference, the range of marques for Worthy Park and their ester levels are:

  • WPEL: less than 60g/laa
  • WPL: 60-119g/laa
  • WPM: 120-239g/laa
  • WPH: 240-360g/laa
  • WPE: up to 800g/laa

Coloured, but not chill filtered and bottled at 45% abv.

Sugar? No

Nose: This smells good. Definite and strong Jamaican pot still, but it’s not big, pungent or funky. A Hampden this is not. Key Lime Pie topped with a banana cream, soft vanillas – vanilla Danish pastry maybe, toasty oak, coconut and a little lemon too. The more I nose this I start to get crushed shells, salty rock-pools and a beach on a hot day. Faint notes of marine fuel and oil in the distance and anchovies marinated in very good olive oil. There is a light marzipan/almond note appearing from time to time too.

Palate: Medium mouth feel. Sharp at first with citrus fruits and yellow stone fruit, quite hot with a little ginger root and white pepper. After the initial heat it’s pretty savoury and salty; brine, green olives, salted fish, shellfish in lemon juice and a big breath of sea breeze when stood on a jetty. Mid-palate and as it moves to the finish the sweeter notes appear with some milk chocolate, vanilla custard, Lady Grey tea and bananas.

Finish: Medium to long. Some salty tang still in there but much sweeter than the palate and more funky; ripe bananas, fresh pineapple, lemon curd, maybe a light butterscotch too and a fudge’y note.

Thoughts? Cracking rum. The nose is a beauty but I’m less keen on the finish if I’m being honest, it’s not “bad” at all, I’d just prefer a bit more intensity and less “safeness”, but that’s just my preference here. Again, a fine example of a Jamaican pot still rum, much more approachable than a Hampden or Long Pond and a good foot in the door if you want to head that way in your rum journey. I’m being a bit spoilt with Jamaicans here at Rumtastic Towers at the moment, they’ve all been very good recently!

I picked this up for £45. That may put people off for a NAS (No Age Statement) rum, but you’ve got to bear in mind it’s 6-10 years old and tropically aged. If you are starting to explore more interesting and complex rum at the moment then it’s one I think worth investing in. Personally, I like the style and I’d buy it again.