Ron Canuto 7 year old

What is it? Ron Canuto Highland Rum is a molasses based, pot still rum from Ecuador, produced by the Zhumir distillery, making this Pure Single Rum. The molasses used is local stuff and they age in Ecuador too, but whilst this is hot it is aged at altitude which actually slows the maturation somewhat. The rum is aged for 7 years in ex-bourbon casks and I note that whilst it doesn’t say it’s single cask rum my bottle has a barrel number on it (barrel number 7) and bottle number 29 – so it does look like it’s come from a single cask.

Coloured, chill filtered and bottled at 40% abv.

Sugar? Yes. 35 g/l of the stuff….

Nose: Bananas. Immediately lots and lots of bananas. Banana sweeties, banana flavour Angel Delight (a powered, ready to make blancmange we have in the UK), Crème de banane and banana bread. Some oak spices pop up with light clove, a little ginger, cedar wood and some vanilla. A touch of caramel and then that’s it.

Palate: Full mouth, sweet, very much so. Clearly obvious that this has been fiddled with. Bananas again, bah! Bloody bananas! That’s all I can get, and fake banana stuff too, so a banana milkshake or banana chews (banana split toffees if you’re in the UK and old enough to remember going to a proper sweet shop). Not much else sadly, no pot still notes at all and not even any heat from the alcohol. I’ll be kind and say there is some vanilla in here too, if anything.

Finish: It does, and quickly too. Blink and you’ll miss it. Guess what is here – banana.

Thoughts? Pass. I’ve had worse rums, I’m struggling to remember when but I’m sure I have. Sweet and just tastes of bananas. I picked this up having not seen anything from Ecuador before and thought I’d give it a go, not one I’ll be getting a repeat of.

£32? Nah, no way. Poor show I’m afraid, don’t waste your money.

Monymusk 12 year old (2003) – Duncan Taylor

What is it? The Duncan Taylor Monymusk 12 year old (2003) is a single cask Jamaican Pure Single Rum (100% Pot still, from molasses, produced at one distillery) from the “Monymusk” distillery. Monymusk isn’t actually a distillery, it’s a brand or type of rum that is produced at the Clarendon distillery in Jamaica – their 100% pot still rum. You can read a lot more about the Monymusk brand and Clarendon in this review; which is of a 9 year old bottled by Kill Devil.

This rum was distilled in August 2003 and bottled in February 2016 by independent bottler Duncan Taylor, making it 12 years old. No details on the location of the maturation but going from from own historic reviews of Duncan Taylor bottles, the colour and taste profile I’d say it was matured in Europe. This bottle is one of 194 bottles from cask number 2. No details on the cask marque or ester levels for this.

Not coloured, not chill-filtered and bottled a cask strength of 52.1% abv.

So, molasses based, 100% pot still Jamaican rum at cask strength. Proper rum then. Perfect. On to the review:

Sugar? No

Nose: Ah, beautiful. We’ve got a soft Jamaican here, but don’t be fooled; there is some ester’y goodness inside lying in wait. Baked bananas drizzled with honey, golden syrup and salted butter. Pineapple jam spread on toasted brioche, toffee and pecan yum-yums and churros straight out of the oil. There is some fresh papaya, pear and lime lifting it up and a grungy smell of shipyards with old ropes, a little tar, distant boat engines and salty sea spray. Right at the back there is some oak evident but it’s pretty mild and doesn’t really impose any will on the rum here.

Palate: Full, rich and oily. A lot more savoury than the nose; olives, olive oil, sticking plasters, salted butter and maybe even a little seaweed. Very little spice, maybe a touch of white pepper but for 52% abv its not hot at all. At the back of the palate things sweeten again to light toffee sauce, maybe butterscotch, green bananas, orange rind and some fresh strawberries, of all things.

Finish: Medium to long. Carries on where the palate left off with sweeter notes, more strawberries, tangerines, cantaloupe melon, mango, limes and a funny sort of salted vanilla. There is a hint of rubber bands and olive oil right at the end.

Thoughts? Delicious. A lighter “heavy” rum if you will. Really good pot still notes, some good esters and amazing texture/mouth feel but plays it with a sweeter, more approachable side. I really like this softer Jamaican pot still stuff, lots of complexity and flavour without blowing your head off. Jamaican rum doesn’t need to be maximum ester, 100% of the time.

I picked this up for £60(!) at the time – late 2017 – and it’s a bargain. I’d easily buy this again at that price, although I suspect it’s likely to have gone up a bit now if there are any left about. I saw one recently (March 2019) for £80, which I think is pushing things a little too far. You’re getting into a different price category altogether there.

 

Rum Nation Demerara 23 year old (1990)

What is it? A right treat, for a start! This rum is from the Port Mourant still, owned by Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) and is molasses based, making it Pure Single Rum. The rum was distilled in 1990 and aged for 14 years (no details of where, but looks to be in Europe), at which point it was bought and transferred into Olorso sherry casks for further ageing – this was done until bottling, in this case 2013 by Rum Nation, but there are some other bottles out there from the same parcel of rum that was aged for 25 years and bottled in 2015.

Not coloured, but chill filtered and bottled at 45% abv.

Sugar: No

Nose: Incredible, exactly what you’d hope for with a well aged Demerara; deep brown sugar (muscavado), really smooth black coffee like a Colombian or Guatemalan, damp leaves, pipe tobacco, really old leather chairs, muddy boots and some roasted chestnuts. Really beautiful soft oak, liquorice, clove, rich vanilla and raisins. There is a savoury side of aniseed balls, black olives and diesel in there too. The smells are all very “big” and rich.

Palate: Full mouth, oily. Old sherry aged whisky for sure, lots of rancio, forest floors and meaty mushrooms. The deep brown sugar arrives with coffee beans, chocolate, marzipan, plums, figs, raisins again and handful of black grapes. Lots of sweet eating liquorice, aniseed, clove, leather and sweet tobacco. A touch of rubber bands, sticking plasters and the back of a stamp keep things interesting.

Finish: Long. Liquorice in bucket loads here, some anise, vanilla and milk chocolate. There is a buzz of black pepper and menthol that pops up, just to keep you on your toes. Roasted nuts again, marzipan topped Christmas cake and a good glug of dry sherry.

Thoughts? Fabulous stuff. This is just what old Navy style Demerara should taste like; big, rich, bold and brooding flavours right through, and slightly dirty too. From nose to finish it is massively complex and deep, sure it’s not perfectly balanced but the pay off is volume and depth of flavour – i’ll take that without issue here.

I paid £100 for this, and honestly would again without much thought. My only issue is that it’s a bit too easy on approach, I’d love to see this at 50% abv, it’d be another level of rum altogether.

Bank’s Connoisseur’s Cut Guyana – Malt Whisky Cask

What is it? Guyanese rum from the Port Mourant Estate, distilled from molasses in the double wooden pot still – so Pure Single Rum. The cask marque is MPMM, which I don’t have too much information on, other than there are many Indie bottlings of Port Mourant marked “MPM” and I believe this means “Main Port Mourant”. This rum was distilled in 1997 where it was matured in ex-bourbon casks for 2 years before being moved over to ex-Malt Whisky casks in 2000. The bottling was done in July 2013 – which makes this rum 15 or 16 years old (depending on the exact distillation and bottling dates). It was part of an outrun of 205 bottles released and going off the taste profile and colour, aged in Europe somewhere (purely speculation on my part).

Natural colour, no chill filtering and bottled at cask strength of 59.58% abv.

Sugar? No.

For the record, I’ve taken this down to about 55% abv as that is the strength I’ve been drinking it at consistently. Nearly 60% abv makes it too narrow and tight, so the flavours just aren’t giving themselves up enough.

Nose: Aniseed, fennel seeds, black olives in brine, capers, shells and rock pools. A handful of dried anchovies and some distant tar. Very savoury and herbal that’s for sure! There is some dried banana and pineapple but drizzled in some type of liquorice sauce, a little sharp gooseberry and mango that has gone off and is fizzy sour. At the back there is a little warm oak, but faint and distant, runny honey and a malty flat beer like note. A scattering of almonds finish it off.

Palate: Full, intense mouth, oily. We’re right back with the nose here; anchovies, capers, seawater. salty olive, olive oil and fresh liquorice root. There is that tarry, oily, WD40 note in here, some faint sweet tobacco smoke and a burst of citrus fruit, but savoury like a smoked and salted box of lemons and limes. Slightly sour too with those gooseberries. There is some cask sweetness here towards the end with thin caramel, honey and a touch of cinnamon.

Finish: Long indeed. Again tar, liquorice and brine. It’s sweeter here though, allowing those honeys, caramels and roasted malty/sweet beer notes to show – I’m definitely picking up some Speyside whisky flavours in the finish. Some nice fresh banana notes pop up, slices of pineapple and green apple too.

Thoughts? Excellent. It’s got some powerful fresh and raw Port Mourant notes to it but you can tell it’s a lot more complex, it’s see time in oak even though the cask isn’t very evident, it tames the spirit. It’s a very intense rum and for £100 it was very pricey at the time I bought this, however, looking at what Independent full proof aged Port Mourants go for now, it seems about right….

I can’t decide if i like this better than the Cognac cask. It’s sweeter. My first thoughts were “it’s better” but with time I’m not sure. The oak/cask on the Cognac cask seemed to have more effect on the rum, which I think is what it needs.

Would I buy this again? Probably. Is it a rum for everyone? No. It’s very focused in what is presents and isn’t for your casual drinker.

Mezan Jamaica 2005 (Worthy Park)

What is it? Jamaican Pure Single Rum, so molasses based, distilled at the Worthy Park distillery, in Jamaica, on a pot still in 2005 and bottled by Independent bottler Mezan in around 2015/2016, making this approx 10 years old. You may see another of these 2005 Jamaica’s around at the moment, that is a more recent bottling (2017) and bottled at a higher abv of 46% abv. From what I understand this rum was entirely matured in Europe. There are no details on the bottle outrun or the marque that has gone into this bottling, and I’ve not been able to find that information out anywhere either.

Not coloured or chill filtered and bottled at 40% abv. It’s ok, Mezan have done away with this low abv now on their more recent bottlings, worry not!

Sugar? No.

Nose: Hmmm, quite a light Worth Park here. Certainly bananas, lemon and lime (Sprite or 7up), very light golden syrup, more so than honey. Some cake’y, bread’y notes, so maybe indeed banana bread or banana pie. A little vanilla maybe, a tiny prickle of oak (I mean tiny) and a little bit of salty brine. Some really lovely generic floral notes are here too but I can’t pick out anything specific.

Palate: Medium mouth. Soft entry, quite acidic at first with green apples, gooseberries, sharp cider, grass and under ripe nectarine. There is a nice, creamier buttery/custard side that appears mid-palate with a touch of honey and chamomile tea, but doesn’t last long and goes salty, tarry and sour again to the finish.

Finish: Medium in length. Sweeter white wine (like a sweet Riesling), some green olives, a little tar, orange blossom honey and even a little milk chocolate pops up! Very little heat, spice or oak at all from the cask.

Thoughts? Quite different to Worthy Parks I’ve had before, I can see the similarities – a good whack of banana in there for sure – but it’s very soft, light and raw. A nice bottle to see how different styles from a distillery present themselves, but for me it was just lacking any real wow or oomph. I can’t even say it was the abv this time, I just think that it was too spirit driven (which is fine normally) but in this case the wrong marque of rum. Maybe this would have normally been blend filler?

Clearly very well made rum and at £33 (at the time of purchase in 2016) was a no brainer, but it’s not a rum I’d go back to. Just not enough on offer for me.