Pusser’s 15 year old review

Pussers 15This blog is logging my journey through rum. I’ve moved on a little since I started out drinking the stuff 8 months or so ago and I’m not so keen on the sugar added rums, however I’m back-dating and to fully journal it I’ll work through reviews in the order I was buying. This means starting with some sugared ones. It’ll get more exciting later on when I get to the single casks, I promise!

What is it? A blend or rums from Guyana and Trinidad that is aged for at least 15 years. Quite heavy use of the wooden pot stills from Guyana. Molasses based.

40% abv. Filtered. Coloured.

Sugar? Yep. Added – on-line sugar tests so between 25 and 30 grams per litre. No other flavourings are added.

Nose: Lots of oak, planks and cut wood, that sort of thing. Baking spices (cinnamon, clove, brown sugar), vanilla, a little bit of liquorice and some tropical fruit, maybe dried mangos.

Palate: Dry at first, sappy with a medium to heavy mouthfeel.  A touch of coffee and slight bitterness, a little tingle of black pepper. Not what I was expecting from rum at all.

Finish: Medium to long, but I get the feeling that it’s hanging around because the sugar has coated my mouth. Too syrupy as it moved from palate to finish, the interesting bitterness goes and there is a flatness that is brought on by the sugar. The final and lingering taste is strongly of over ripe bananas. I like bananas.

Thoughts? It’s a nice rum. As one to start with coming from whisky the oak and bitterness breaks me in a bit, but it’s too sweet. If they had toned the sugar down a bit it would have been a lot better, but it’s 15 years old and a good price, so I can’t complain too much.

2 responses to “Pusser’s 15 year old review

    • They’re not really all that comparable, the 15yo is much more highly sugared than the Blue label. Personally I like them both but could really chose one over the other in terms of product line as it all depends on your tolerance to sugar and whether you want a good young rum or something with more complexity.

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